Posted by: calloftheandes | May 10, 2017

Turn on the Tap and . . .

by Ralph Kurtenbach, blogger

The graphic on the screen at church featured a Bible with a faucet—or tap—attached to it, spewing out dollar bills. The pastor’s message on a section from the New Testament book of Titus emphasized the need for sound biblical doctrine. Then to contrast, he showed the faucet-Bible and commented on a spurious teaching that is circulating.

That faucet stuck out at me. I had just visited Yalare, a remote community in Ecuador’s coastal province of Esmeraldas. The folk there had helped Reach Beyond’s César Cortez and Edison Caiza put the final touches on a project, followed by the big moment and inauguration of the clean water system.

What did people in Yalare want from their faucets? Clean water. That’s a lot different than praying that God would make me rich or buy me a Mercedes Benz.

Edison Caiza (right) works on a wire with youth from Yalare, Ecuador.

As we visited, people expressed appreciation and we took photos. This was a significant advance in Yalare—clean water from a faucet at each resident’s house (those who elected to join the project.) They had done it by themselves with motivation from their leaders and a system design by Cortez.

People—in Ecuador and everywhere—need clean water projects. In developing countries, half of the hospital beds are occupied by people suffering from maladies caused by water-transmitted diseases, according to Water Aid. Worldwide, diarrhea kills more children each year than AIDS, malaria and measles combined. Statistics reveal that annually about 700,000 children—nearly 2,000 a day—die because of unsafe water and poor sanitation.

Edison Caiza and Cesar Cortez at the electrical panel of the Yalare project

Just over half of the world’s population has water piped to their homes. Yalare joined that group in March. In Ecuador’s highlands meanwhile, Loma de Pacay joined the “haves” of clean water to their homes in February.

Even amid these jarring realities, Cortez views water as a means not an end in itself. It is a way to introduce people to Jesus and disciple those who’ve already met the one who declared, “If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink” (John 7:37, TLB).

As people of the Latin America Region mature in their biblical understanding, their grounding in the Bible is deepening. Their grasp of Latin American believers’ growing role in worldwide missions is also greater than ever before.

And sometimes the beginning to this broader view—this mission vision—begins with clean water coming from a faucet.

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Responses

  1. Awesome article Ralph! Great way to ‘hit home’ in some hearts!

    *Blessings,*

    *Darrell and/or Sondra Holden *

    *Missionaries of Ripe for Harvest*

    *Serving with Reach Beyond and Extreme Response International*

    *www.ReachBeyondTheMountains.com *

    On Wed, May 10, 2017 at 2:03 PM, Calloftheandes Weblog wrote:

    > calloftheandes posted: ” The graphic on the screen at church featured a > Bible with a faucet—or tap—attached to it, spewing out dollar bills. The > pastor’s message on a section from the New Testament book of Titus > emphasized the need for sound biblical doctrine. Then to contras” >


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